Taiwan

//Taiwan

Officially deemed to be part of The Republic of China, the island of Taiwan, formerly known as Formosa, is the fourth largest island in the world. Taiwan’s most popular tourist destination is the city of Taipei which serves as the central location for political and economic affairs. The world’s 19th largest economy occupies 35,000 kilometers of land with terrain ranging from the rugged Yu Shan/Jade Mountain, to the Chianan Plains. Prior to 2010, Taiwan’s Taipei 101 building was the tallest structure in the world.

Accommodation establishments and restaurants are generously sprinkled throughout the island, often within easy walking distance of attractions and sports venues. One landmark that is definitely a must-see is the National Palace Museum in Taipei. This complex houses approximately 800,000 Chinese artifacts in media ranging from bronze, jade and porcelain to calligraphy and paintings. Many tourists, especially those from the USA are surprised to learn that island’s national sport, baseball, has produced players who are members of U.S., major league teams.

One of the most popular ways for tourist is to experience the nightlife of Taiwan where you could start of by enjoying a Mongolian barbecue feast at a local downtown restaurant. Strolling along Huaxi Street to explore Taipei’s exotic market area and to search for a perfect souvenir in a Snake Alley shop is something you would not want to miss out. The Longshan Temple is where the Buddhist rites and ceremonies take place on a daily basis.

There is really no best time to visit Taiwan unless one desires to partake of its cultural festivals. Near the end of the Chinese New Year, at the Miaoli Bombing, The Dragon Festival, spectators are invited to join in throwing ignited fireworks at a dancing dragon. At the 1st full moon of the lunar calendar, the Lantern Festival exudes a romantic aura as guests create, decorate and display lanterns and feast on signature dishes such as Tangyuan, rice dumplings with sweet and/or tangy stuffing.